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Emira Review Index [V6 FE]

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For those looking for the latest Emira V6 FE reviews scheduled to be released today, I've self-volunteered to maintain a quick reference index here.
Please let me know of any missing articles and I'll update accordingly. (y)

ReviewerTypeDirect Link
EdmundsArticle
Harry's Garage (Harry Metcalfe)Video Review

Harry drives the Sports and Tour suspension back to back on the same road and shares his thoughts.
Schmee150 (Tim Burton)Video ReviewPublished 21st June
Carwow (Mat Watson)Video Review
TopGearArticles and VideoPublished 3rd July
Chris Harris talks about the Lotus Emira

Published 20th June

AutoTrader (Rory Reid)Video Review
EvoArticle and Video Review
CARArticle and Video ReviewPublished 22nd July


Lotus Emira vs Cayman 718 GTS vs Alpine 110s
AutocarArticle and Video Review
PistonheadsArticle
KHTVVideo Review
The DriveArticle
AutoExpressArticle
Pictures:
WhichCarArticle
CarBuyerArticle
HagertyArticle
Road and TrackArticlePublished 1st September
Lotus Emira Road and Track Drive

GoodwoodArticle
The IntercoolerPodcastReasonably good post-embargo Emira discussion on The Intercooler.
MotortrendArticle
DriveArticle
AFRArticle
ParkersArticle
CarExpertArticle
Caffeine & MachineArticle
Photos on Instagram:
The Sunday Times DrivingArticle
Car and DriverArticle
The SunArticle
AutoCar UKArticlePublished 2nd July

 
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It seems like there were other issues with the car that weren't related to the stress the performance testing was putting on the car. The gear linkage broke, which caused the first car they tested to be stuck in fourth gear, and perhaps most concerning, they couldn't get the second car to the 6,800 RPM redline (it wouldn't go past 6,000). For a car that starts with a relatively low redline, that supposedly shouldn't have serious powertrain issues on account of using a Toyota engine, that may be the most concerning thing I've read as a potential buyer.
But..... the wipers and the AC worked, yes?
 
But this is exactly the problem and why this is unrealistic. How many of us have a factory team with us to make sure our cars are still functioning after being abused like this? If they want to do real world testing, they need to test a car like you or I can buy, the way we would have it and use it, instead of abusing it to such a degree that the factory has to send a team out to try and keep the car running.
Before BMW or Porsche gives a car to the press it goes through a thorough "stress test" by a factory driver. Lotus on the other hand said, "here...take this one".

That said, to break a 1/2 shaft....OMG! What the hell? Beyond abuse. Seems to me M/T was TRYING to break the car, perpetuate the stereotype and "report" on the failure.
I don't believe this is a case of the "media" entering into the test with a preconceived outcome of British=bad build quality. I've been a subscriber to Motor Trend, Car and Driver, Road & Track, and Automobile (RIP) for 30 years and I can count on one hand how many of the cars they had which broke during their performance testing. If anything these magazine root for sports cars and generally are accused of making excuses to encourage more of them from the manufactures. Collectively these magazine have tested many thousands of cars in the same way over the years and almost all of those cars were able to handle things. The last time testing went this poorly was with the hot Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio.

Bottom line is that dumping the clutch at high RPMs on a relatively new sports car should not result in an axel snapping and your shift linkage falling apart on separate runs. Here's hoping this was a VERY abused press car and not representative of most ownership experiences.

FWIW, I still love my car and would have bought it anyways. I just accept that shit is going to happen like the well documented AC not working, power steering going out, paint bubbling and peeling (all real threads on here), ect...... My plan is get it fixed and back on the road as soon as possible, cause all the good the article talks about is spot on. The Emira is so engaging to drive, it's just a blast that puts a smile on my face every time I'm behind the wheel!
 
I don't believe this is a case of the "media" entering into the test with a preconceived outcome of British=bad build quality. I've been a subscriber to Motor Trend, Car and Driver, Road & Track, and Automobile (RIP) for 30 years and I can count on one hand how many of the cars they had which broke during their performance testing. If anything these magazine root for sports cars and generally are accused of making excuses to encourage more of them from the manufactures. Collectively these magazine have tested many thousands of cars in the same way over the years and almost all of those cars were able to handle things. The last time testing went this poorly was with the hot Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio.

Bottom line is that dumping the clutch at high RPMs on a relatively new sports car should not result in an axel snapping and your shift linkage falling apart on separate runs. Here's hoping this was a VERY abused press car and not representative of most ownership experiences.

FWIW, I still love my car and would have bought it anyways. I just accept that shit is going to happen like the well documented AC not working, power steering going out, paint bubbling and peeling (all real threads on here), ect...... My plan is get it fixed and back on the road as soon as possible, cause all the good the article talks about is spot on. The Emira is so engaging to drive, it's just a blast that puts a smile on my face every time I'm behind the wheel!
I don't recall Car & Driver, Road & Track or Automobile testing their cars this way. Motor Trend was traditionally an American Car magazine that typically tested muscle cars, Corvettes, etc. Those cars were all about 1/4 mile times which was an American performance thing, so doing clutch dumps to launch off the line was something the people who drove those cars did, which would have justified testing cars that way.

I'm guessing the first Emira they had problems with was probably a very used and abused press car. The second car didn't have those problems, but again, that's not how you drive a Lotus!
 
I dismissed Motor Trend as long ago as the late 1980s. It was clear then that this was a third-rate magazine designed purely to sell ads. There was a very strong correlation between the biggest ads and the best reviews.

That said, it's clear that Geely sees the Emira as a transition car, and that transition is occurring quickly. So the energy is going into the products they want to sell more of, as the originators of preferably decades of future products. That's not the Emira, which is the end of the line. So I'm a little disappointed but not all that surprised that the cars (looks like there were three) that went to the MT people weren't necessarily carefully prepped.

I've never dumped a clutch at 5,000 RPM. Don't think I ever will, at least not on purpose. And people who drive that way will certainly find cars better set up for that; indeed, that to me is what the American Muyscle Caar is about, and those have never appealed to me.
 
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I don't recall Car & Driver, Road & Track or Automobile testing their cars this way. Motor Trend was traditionally an American Car magazine that typically tested muscle cars, Corvettes, etc. Those cars were all about 1/4 mile times which was an American performance thing, so doing clutch dumps to launch off the line was something the people who drove those cars did, which would have justified testing cars that way.

I'm guessing the first Emira they had problems with was probably a very used and abused press car. The second car didn't have those problems, but again, that's not how you drive a Lotus!
Car and Driver used to beat the crap out of WRXs and Evos, crazy launches at high RPMs to get those lazy turbos going. All of these magazines have been testing both 0-60 in addition to 1/4 mile times for all of their road tests for decades. I agree with you that they're not redline neutral dropping Toyota Camrys to achieve 0-60 times, but absent launch control, all the magazines do attempt a number of launch methods to achieve the best times. The RPMs hit during the testing is all about the car itself, for example 5500 RPMs in a Hellcat would be dumb cause it would take forever for the rear tires to stop spinning and actually hook up. On the flipside an 8900RPM redline Honda S2000 from 20 years ago was being tested pretty aggressively to get those top 0-60 numbers.

I agree with you that first Emira had to be a press car that had been repeatedly beaten on by who knows how many news outlets. I only wish Lotus would comment to confirm that as fact, but even without their word it's a safe bet. I also agree with you that anyone buying an Emira for 0-60 times is clearly a moron, really misses the point of this car!


 
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