Latest Car Magazine review — says it all

Well........that's not I wanted to hear! I'm trying to stay cautiously optimistic that the DCT is NOT the sluggish ZF clone it's being portrayed as.
 
well, well, I read the German car magazines in german language as well and guess what version they mainly recommend...... the i4 AMG without talking down the V6 though.
From my point of view only an own test drive can decide which one you like better.
 
Pretty positive review overall. Not sure what they are talking about with slow touchscreen software. Maybe an issue with their specific car?
 
well, well, I read the German car magazines in german language as well and guess what version they mainly recommend...... the i4 AMG without talking down the V6 though.
From my point of view only an own test drive can decide which one you like better.
Soooooo, the German reviewer prefers the German manufactured drivetrain. I'd like to believe that's an impartial opinion......
 
Soooooo, the German reviewer prefers the German manufactured drivetrain. I'd like to believe that's an impartial opinion......
Sorry, no. Not patriotic reasons. The german reviewers come purely from the technical point of view. Four cylinder 2.0 Turbo with dct is a modern technique and engine producing immense hp and torque with little fuel consumption. They purely see the fine technique behind. It can be compared with 718 and so on.The V6 you can not compare with modern technique and there are not a lot of cars left you could compare with. Other reviewers come from the more emotional side. Traditional is good, combustion engine with super charger and manual shifting.
I like both and I have the V6 manual, but I would also love the i4
Hope this clarifies my other thread, to avoid that it is going in the wrong direction.
 
This is the most negative review of the DCT I’ve seen. Other reviews alluded to the shift being a bit ponderous at times but this seems more damning. I really don’t understand how they could have taken the software from the A45s and made such a backwards step.

My previous E90 M3 had BMW first gen DCT back in 2012 and I would give it a 7/10 on the original software and a 9/10 with the later GTS map update. The new Audi RS3 is actually a bit more ponderous but still fairly snappy.

I guess it just highlights the need for a test drive before committing. It sounds like that’s going to be a challenge for those of us who are near the front of the queue. But there is also the hope of a map update later assuming the problems are purely software and not mechanical.
 
Two things I noticed which are not my experience:
(1) "You need to prod the drive mode switch several times before the car will allow you to switch between settings".
I thought that initially, but you only need to prod it once, and wait for a second or two. Prodding it repetitively seems to cancel the previous prod(s).
(2) "The middling Sport setup is firm for the road" - uh, as far as I can tell, the change in mode does not affect the suspension at all, so describing it as "firm" makes no sense.
(V6 FE Touring chassis)
 
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This is the most negative review of the DCT I’ve seen. Other reviews alluded to the shift being a bit ponderous at times but this seems more damning. I really don’t understand how they could have taken the software from the A45s and made such a backwards step.

My previous E90 M3 had BMW first gen DCT back in 2012 and I would give it a 7/10 on the original software and a 9/10 with the later GTS map update. The new Audi RS3 is actually a bit more ponderous but still fairly snappy.

I guess it just highlights the need for a test drive before committing. It sounds like that’s going to be a challenge for those of us who are near the front of the queue. But there is also the hope of a map update later assuming the problems are purely software and not mechanical.
I don’t think lotus is even allowed to touch the TCU programming according to initial reviews on the i4.
 
Sorry, no. Not patriotic reasons. The german reviewers come purely from the technical point of view. Four cylinder 2.0 Turbo with dct is a modern technique and engine producing immense hp and torque with little fuel consumption. They purely see the fine technique behind. It can be compared with 718 and so on.The V6 you can not compare with modern technique and there are not a lot of cars left you could compare with. Other reviewers come from the more emotional side. Traditional is good, combustion engine with super charger and manual shifting.
I like both and I have the V6 manual, but I would also love the i4
Hope this clarifies my other thread, to avoid that it is going in the wrong direction.
Please don't misunderstand my comments I was merely trying to be cautiously optimistic that the review might NOT be biased. I'm coming from a M4 DCT world and absoulutely love the snappiness of using the paddles to shift. In fact I never use the automatic mode. I've driven various other marque DCTs e.g. R8, RS5, TTRS, PDK, etc. heck my Hyundai Santa Cruz has a DCT (which really is disappointing) and while each is a little different the overall feel is more than acceptable (except the Santa Cruz). My take away from the reviews I've seen so far have me wondering if I'm going to be disappointed if the Emira DCT isn't quick enough for my taste. Even a slight delay in shifting using the paddles will make me wonder is I should have opted for an automatic V6. Fingers crossed that the reviewers are being overly critical.
 
Please don't misunderstand my comments I was merely trying to be cautiously optimistic that the review might NOT be biased. I'm coming from a M4 DCT world and absoulutely love the snappiness of using the paddles to shift. In fact I never use the automatic mode. I've driven various other marque DCTs e.g. R8, RS5, TTRS, PDK, etc. heck my Hyundai Santa Cruz has a DCT (which really is disappointing) and while each is a little different the overall feel is more than acceptable (except the Santa Cruz). My take away from the reviews I've seen so far have me wondering if I'm going to be disappointed if the Emira DCT isn't quick enough for my taste. Even a slight delay in shifting using the paddles will make me wonder is I should have opted for an automatic V6. Fingers crossed that the reviewers are being overly critical.

It’s not that the shifts are slow, I’ll break down what I think the issues are.

A few different types of shifts:

- Upshift at lower to mid rpms — these will be very fast and maybe not as brutal as the f8x dct (overly aggressive imho — I chirp tires through fourth gear in mine on level 3 dct setting upshifts on 40tw compounds at the track and it really upsets the car balance).
- Upshifts near redline — reviewers have commented that there’s a noticeable tachometer display lag, I’ve seen this myself too, so if you’re waiting till the full displayed tachometer limit to shift you’re gonna feel the engine fall flat on its face as the fuel cutoff is engaged, the m4 does the same thing I’m sure you’ve felt it, just exacerbated by the display lag.
- Downshifts — the TCU seems extremely conservative here, smoking tire talked about how if a downshift puts you within 1K rpm of redline it simply won’t downshift or will be slow to do so.

I think when you combine conservative TCU shift safety logic and display lag you just get this impression of a not very responsive DCT.
 
I don’t think lotus is even allowed to touch the TCU programming according to initial reviews on the i4.
Reviews have been unclear about this. Some say it's not a Mercedes-sourced TCU at all, but a standalone Bosch unit that Lotus has programmed. I don't know what the actual reality is at this point.
 
Reviews have been unclear about this. Some say it's not a Mercedes-sourced TCU at all, but a standalone Bosch unit that Lotus has programmed. I don't know what the actual reality is at this point.
Hi Porter

Take a look at the following link. It is made by Mercedes in Transylvania (so it is a bit “blood-thirsty” - Just could not help myself🤣🤣🤣)

 
Reviews have been unclear about this. Some say it's not a Mercedes-sourced TCU at all, but a standalone Bosch unit that Lotus has programmed. I don't know what the actual reality is at this point.
I’d heard from Lotus staff that AMG would not let Lotus directly alter the engine management or gearbox software. AMG engineers worked with Lotus to development the Emira-specific tuning and it’s then locked down.

But some of the aftermarket AMG tuners must be fairly confident they can crack it. For example Litchfield have ordered an early i4 for R&D work.
 
Being in line for an i4 FE, locked in without any possibility “to swap to another mistress”. Thanks Lotus for never showing us the actual car until over 2 years after we had to “sign in blood, and swear to never ask for any change to our order” - and only then they show the car and have it reviewed; with the results we have all seen. Still my favorite is the Harry & Son presentation, which is the most fair & honest of them all. And we all know that Matt & Zack will prefer the car that is most suitable to race in the canyons. (Bless them; I enjoy watching and feel the excitement - but I won’t have any chance to drive like that where I live.)

However, I am used to read reviews and critics (in other fields), and it is so true that “you have to review the reviewer” and “take many impressions with a grain of salt”.

It is very telling that this, very biased, latest i4 reviewer insists on solely calling the i4 gearbox “an automatic” even though in the Alpine A110 S every other reviewer has no problem to call it by its proper Dual Clutch Transmission name (including similar transmissions in other sports cars). Porsche too is selling many (most?) of their Cayman with their own PDK (Porsche Doppelkuplung (Dual Clutch). Sure there is no clutch pedal - ergo “automatic”, but other than this similarity, dual clutch gearboxes are the most common to use in Motorsport along with sequential shift transmissions all the way up to F1, because they are way faster and give better lap times.

Sure, several reviewers have found flaws with the programming of the AMG sourced 8 speed DCT box used in i4. There is also some doubt whether Lotus is allowed by AMG to reprogram it. Only time will show. It is possible that the way it currently is, it is less suitable for track driving, or other driving under extreme conditions. For us who have committed to the i4 (FE) model as described above; we simply have to put our faith in that there a reprogramming solution (an update) will arrive sooner or later. And, as we can clearly see from reviews of Alpine A110 (S) and Porsche Cayman PDK, not to speak of most Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Bugattis, and even the venerable Nissan GTR (NISMO included), all are equipped with Dual Clutch transmissions. Today mainly BMW is an exception since they use ZF torque converter automatic transmissions (except for very few models with manual transmissions, and the electric models with a single speed🤣)

It seems to me it is a case of “he who laughs last, laughs best”. I am confident that the i4 will be refined and reprogrammed over time. I am definetely looking forward to mine (and simply hope Lotus gets in full control over their QC process).
 
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