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Emira brake specs confirmed AP Racing 370mm/350mm

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The Emira's brake specs have been confirmed by Scott Walker (UK Sales Manager) here in this video (~16:20 mark) from the recent Concorde event:
  • Front: 4 piston AP Racing calipers w/ 370mm (14.6") drilled rotors
  • Rear: 4 piston AP Racing calipers w/ 350mm (13.7") drilled rotors
Basically the same as the Evora GT. In comparison, the Cayman GTS features 6 piston Brembos up front, 4 in the rear, and 350/330mm rotors (380mm all around on the GT4). And here's an interesting article on 4 vs 6 piston calipers.

 
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I learned today that Brembo owns AP Racing.
 
I learned today that Brembo owns AP Racing.
There's a whole family of companies in there. AP Racing, SBS Friction, ByBre, etc. They also have close relationships on friction material engineering with Ferodo, Mintex, and others.
 
The Emira's brake specs have been confirmed by Scott Walker (UK Sales Manager) here in this video (~16:20 mark) from the recent Concorde event:
  • Front: 4 piston AP Racing calipers w/ 370mm (14.6") drilled rotors
  • Rear: 4 piston AP Racing calipers w/ 350mm (13.7") drilled rotors
Basically the same as the Evora GT. In comparison, the Cayman GTS features 6 piston Brembos up front, 4 in the rear, and 350/330mm rotors (380mm all around on the GT4). And here's an interesting article on 4 vs 6 piston calipers.

Nice article....4 pot AP racing all good for me, use one of there twin plate clutches on the jet bike, well made parts,
 
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  • #7
Nice article....4 pot AP racing all good for me, use one of there twin plate clutches on the jet bike, well made parts,
I believe Lotus uses an AP clutch and light weight flywheel for the Emira too! At least that's what the roadshow rep told me..
 
Let's dive in on the braking system a bit! The Evora GT uses very similar brakes, unknown whether they are identical but the geometry is equivalent. AP Racing 4 pots, 370mm front / 350mm rear.

Assuming the whole system is similar on the Emira to what they did on the updated/recent Evora variants, the performance should be absolutely excellent for a factory braking system. It's totally unknown whether the system is the exact same or not, but Lotus do tend to standardize where possible between models so there's a good chance the late model Evora GT fitment might be carried over.

AP Racing uses a standardized system for their brake part numbers, so we can do some sleuthing.
1647372993658.png


2021 Evora GT/GT410/etc front brake pads are Lotus part number A132J0326S. The part number printed directly on the pad is AP Racing 356 CP7040X61BX-DS25HP. Image:
1647366185479.png


That's an AP Racing CP7040D61-type pad profile. The section at the end is the friction compound. In this case DS25HP indicates that it's the Ferodo DS2500HP, which is sometimes called DS2500+, a variant of the DS2500 compound for street applications in heavier vehicles (i.e. not superlight).
1647370527115.png

AP Racing offers this aftermarket in their own APF405 compound, Ferodo DS2500, Ferodo DS2500HP, Ferodo DS3000, Pagid RS29, Raybestos ST45, and Raybestos ST47.


The rear pad for the same car (2021 Evora GT) is Lotus part number A132J0001S, which is printed on the pad as AP Racing 420 CP6600X55BX-DS25HP, so it's a similar configuration to the front pad but in a slightly smaller geometry to suit the smaller rear rotor.
1647372672119.png

1647372434241.png

AP Racing offers this aftermarket in their own APF404 compound, Ferodo DS2500, Ferodo DS3000, and Pagid RS14B. Lotus likely has the pad made for them in the DS2500HP compound to match the fronts.


There is a ton of information available in the AP Racing catalog in the Brake Pads section about all of these compounds, about the available variations of AP's own pads in this particular shape (profile), and a wealth of technical data.

This same pad geometry is also available directly from other brake vendors (Hawk, EBC, Carbotech, etc) in a variety of different compounds to suit particular applications.


All this is simply to say... for those who want something different from the factory pad for a race or track-day application, there's a whole world of race-oriented pads available, for those who want to gain outright performance at significant cost to noise and/or dust. Almost all "factory" pads make a necessary compromise in raw performance to gain quiet and low-dust operation for daily usability in the real world, and I expect the Emira to be no different. Brakes are naturally very noisy, and the engineering needed to make them livable and comfortable while also performing well in a range of conditions is very, very difficult.

Warning/caveat: High performance street/trackday brake pads are notoriously annoying to live with on the street, so I discourage experimentation if you aren't prepared for the compromise. Also, the most aggressive race pads that provide extreme performance usually require significant heat before full friction behavior and should never be used on public roads, because they are essentially unusable in the cold after first setting off, and WILL result in a collision or other incident that could lead to injury or death. Please be safe and smart.

Hope some of this helps someone down the line.
 
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  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #9
Let's dive in on the braking system a bit! The Evora GT uses very similar brakes, unknown whether they are identical but the geometry is equivalent. AP Racing 4 pots, 370mm front / 350mm rear.

Assuming the whole system is similar on the Emira to what they did on the updated/recent Evora variants, the performance should be absolutely excellent for a factory braking system. It's totally unknown whether the system is the exact same or not, but Lotus do tend to standardize where possible between models so there's a good chance the late model Evora GT fitment might be carried over.

AP Racing uses a standardized system for their brake part numbers, so we can do some sleuthing.
View attachment 3927

2021 Evora GT/GT410/etc front brake pads are Lotus part number A132J0326S. The part number printed directly on the pad is AP Racing 356 CP7040X61BX-DS25HP. Image:
View attachment 3921

That's an AP Racing CP7040D61-type pad profile. The section at the end is the friction compound. In this case DS25HP indicates that it's the Ferodo DS2500HP, which is sometimes called DS2500+, a variant of the DS2500 compound for heavier vehicle applications.
View attachment 3923
AP Racing offers this aftermarket in their own APF405 compound, Ferodo DS2500, Ferodo DS2500HP, Ferodo DS3000, Pagid RS29, Raybestos ST45, and Raybestos ST47.


The rear pad for the same car (2021 Evora GT) is Lotus part number A132J0001S, which is printed on the pad as AP Racing 420 CP6600X55BX-DS25HP, so it's a similar configuration to the front pad but in a slightly smaller geometry to suit the smaller rear rotor.
View attachment 3925
View attachment 3924
AP Racing offers this aftermarket in their own APF404 compound, Ferodo DS2500, Ferodo DS3000, and Pagid RS14B. Lotus likely has the pad made for them in the DS2500HP compound to match the fronts.


There is a ton of information available in the AP Racing catalog in the Brake Pads section about all of these compounds, about the available variations of AP's own pads in this particular shape (profile), and a wealth of technical data.

This same pad geometry is also available directly from other brake vendors (Hawk, EBC, Carbotech, etc) in a variety of different compounds to suit particular applications.


All this is simply to say... for those who want something different from the factory pad for a race or track-day application, there's a whole world of race-oriented pads available, for those who want to gain outright performance at significant cost to noise and/or dust. Almost all "factory" pads make a necessary compromise in raw performance to gain quiet and low-dust operation for daily usability in the real world, and I expect the Emira to be no different. Brakes are naturally very noisy, and the engineering needed to make them livable and comfortable while also performing well in a range of conditions is very, very difficult.

Warning/caveat: High performance street/trackday brake pads are notoriously annoying to live with on the street, so I discourage experimentation if you aren't prepared for the compromise. Also, the most aggressive race pads that provide extreme performance usually require significant heat before full friction behavior and should never be used on public roads, because they are essentially unusable in the cold after first setting off, and WILL result in a collision or other incident that could lead to injury or death. Please be safe and smart.

Hope some of this helps someone down the line.

Excellent info. I'm fairly certain these are the exact same calipers that were on the Evora GT (likely the same 2500 pads too and same size rotors). I guess the only difference would be the 2 piece rotors on the Emira and the parking brake being that little additional caliper on the rears. The Evoras didn't have this, right?
 
Excellent info. I'm fairly certain these are the exact same calipers that were on the Evora GT (likely the same 2500 pads too and same size rotors). I guess the only difference would be the 2 piece rotors on the Emira and the parking brake being that little additional caliper on the rears. The Evoras didn't have this, right?
The recent Evora models like the Evora GT/Sport/etc also use 2-piece rotors. You can see the 2020 Evora GT rear setup in this photo:
1647377911511.png


The Emira's e-brake is electronic, so it needs a hydraulic actuation with a mini-caliper. On the Evora the handbrake is a traditional type and actuates a drum brake that is internal to the rotor, inboard. #13 in the diagram:
1647377824606.png
 
I forgot where I heard, but the base model cars may not have 2-piece rotors standard?
 
I forgot where I heard, but the base model cars may not have 2-piece rotors standard?
Yep that's been confirmed now. Base models will have 1-piece rotors. The FE cars will have 2-piece. It will likely be part of an option package in future (Driver's Pack? who knows).
 
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  • #13
Yep that's been confirmed now. Base models will have 1-piece rotors. The FE cars will have 2-piece. It will likely be part of an option package in future (Driver's Pack? who knows).
Yeah, I think it's the track pack that includes the 2 piece rotors... Here's a shot of the standard rotor setup..

 
Let's dive in on the braking system a bit! The Evora GT uses very similar brakes, unknown whether they are identical but the geometry is equivalent. AP Racing 4 pots, 370mm front / 350mm rear.

Assuming the whole system is similar on the Emira to what they did on the updated/recent Evora variants, the performance should be absolutely excellent for a factory braking system. It's totally unknown whether the system is the exact same or not, but Lotus do tend to standardize where possible between models so there's a good chance the late model Evora GT fitment might be carried over.

AP Racing uses a standardized system for their brake part numbers, so we can do some sleuthing.
View attachment 3927

2021 Evora GT/GT410/etc front brake pads are Lotus part number A132J0326S. The part number printed directly on the pad is AP Racing 356 CP7040X61BX-DS25HP. Image:
View attachment 3921

That's an AP Racing CP7040D61-type pad profile. The section at the end is the friction compound. In this case DS25HP indicates that it's the Ferodo DS2500HP, which is sometimes called DS2500+, a variant of the DS2500 compound for street applications in heavier vehicles (i.e. not superlight).
View attachment 3923
AP Racing offers this aftermarket in their own APF405 compound, Ferodo DS2500, Ferodo DS2500HP, Ferodo DS3000, Pagid RS29, Raybestos ST45, and Raybestos ST47.


The rear pad for the same car (2021 Evora GT) is Lotus part number A132J0001S, which is printed on the pad as AP Racing 420 CP6600X55BX-DS25HP, so it's a similar configuration to the front pad but in a slightly smaller geometry to suit the smaller rear rotor.
View attachment 3925
View attachment 3924
AP Racing offers this aftermarket in their own APF404 compound, Ferodo DS2500, Ferodo DS3000, and Pagid RS14B. Lotus likely has the pad made for them in the DS2500HP compound to match the fronts.


There is a ton of information available in the AP Racing catalog in the Brake Pads section about all of these compounds, about the available variations of AP's own pads in this particular shape (profile), and a wealth of technical data.

This same pad geometry is also available directly from other brake vendors (Hawk, EBC, Carbotech, etc) in a variety of different compounds to suit particular applications.


All this is simply to say... for those who want something different from the factory pad for a race or track-day application, there's a whole world of race-oriented pads available, for those who want to gain outright performance at significant cost to noise and/or dust. Almost all "factory" pads make a necessary compromise in raw performance to gain quiet and low-dust operation for daily usability in the real world, and I expect the Emira to be no different. Brakes are naturally very noisy, and the engineering needed to make them livable and comfortable while also performing well in a range of conditions is very, very difficult.

Warning/caveat: High performance street/trackday brake pads are notoriously annoying to live with on the street, so I discourage experimentation if you aren't prepared for the compromise. Also, the most aggressive race pads that provide extreme performance usually require significant heat before full friction behavior and should never be used on public roads, because they are essentially unusable in the cold after first setting off, and WILL result in a collision or other incident that could lead to injury or death. Please be safe and smart.

Hope some of this helps someone down the line.

Awesome info thank you! Really solid set of brakes! More than enough for my needs so Im happy :)
 
The recent Evora models like the Evora GT/Sport/etc also use 2-piece rotors. You can see the 2020 Evora GT rear setup in this photo:
View attachment 3932

The Emira's e-brake is electronic, so it needs a hydraulic actuation with a mini-caliper. On the Evora the handbrake is a traditional type and actuates a drum brake that is internal to the rotor, inboard. #13 in the diagram:
View attachment 3931
Great detail on the brakes, thanks. I wonder if the Emira's disc bells are aluminium or steel? The Evora's were steel so I guess the Emira's will be the same. I once looked at a used Evora 410 Sport which was immaculate apart from rusting disc bells - it would be nice if this isn't an issue on the Evora.
 
Great detail on the brakes, thanks. I wonder if the Emira's disc bells are aluminium or steel? The Evora's were steel so I guess the Emira's will be the same. I once looked at a used Evora 410 Sport which was immaculate apart from rusting disc bells - it would be nice if this isn't an issue on the Evora.
I believe the disc bells are aluminium in the Emira. They certainly look alloy as well and are of a different design as they need to be thicker than the steel ones to maintain strength.

It was mentioned in one of the recent reviews but I can't recall which one.
 
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  • #17
Watching the reviews this morning and noticed drilled AND slotted rotors... I realize these cars aren't 100% production spec, but interesting to see...

This screenshot is from the carwow review:

Screenshot_20220607-102907_YouTube.jpg
 
Has anyone changed the pads and confirmed the part numbers? Expecting I’ll need to replace soon and considering options for purchase and DIY fit v trip to central lotus…
 

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