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Manual Transmission Clutch Replacement

Oak100

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Is Emira manual transmission design the same as Evora or new design? I'm hoping we don't need to remove rear clamshell and engine just to replace clutch.
 
I asked the same question a while back as its also a concern of mine. It seems like clutch replacement may be a similar affair to the Evora - which means engine pull. But who knows until the official service manual is released.

There is more room in the Emira given the firewall has moved inwards towards the cabin by about 15cm to accomodate cooling and packaging needs of the i4 so this may provide opportunity to do things differently.
 
I was going to add that there are many manual Evora drivers who have 100,000+kms on the original clutch. Obviously it depends on how you drive it but it should last quite a while if treated with some care.
 
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That is going to suck if that's the case. I'm seeing estimates at 7-9k USD for Evora clutch replacement over on lotus talk. Almost 3x the cost of cayman clutch replacement.
 
It looks like the emira has body panels all round no front or rear clam the car is bigger though so surely they have thought of clutch change.
 
I was going to add that there are many manual Evora drivers who have 100,000+kms on the original clutch. Obviously it depends on how you drive it but it should last quite a while if treated with some care.
I'm just about to clock 90,000 miles on my original clutch. It's like a brick, but no slippage yet.
Dealer often threatens I need a new clutch, but the massive cost is worrying me.
 
I'm just about to clock 90,000 miles on my original clutch. It's like a brick, but no slippage yet.
Dealer often threatens I need a new clutch, but the massive cost is worrying me.
If the clutch gets hard to depress it typically needs a clutch fluid change.
 
Sadly that's been done.
You stop noticing it.
People do stop and stare at my oversized left leg though
That's strange. I don't see why it would get heavy when being worn out. Could be a clutch master cylinder perhaps?
 
I was told by the lead Lotus technician at the viewing I attended that the tranny services will be the same as the Evora.
 
Several dealers have now worked out how to do the Evora clutch change without full clam and engine removal. Some are confident enough to do it for a fixed price.

The Emira engine, clutch and transmission setup is the same as the Evora, but the engine bay is larger and the body is made up of panels rather than a clamshell. So it should be an easier job than the Evora. As others have said, plenty of high mileage Evoras still running the original clutch.
 
Several dealers have now worked out how to do the Evora clutch change without full clam and engine removal. Some are confident enough to do it for a fixed price.

The Emira engine, clutch and transmission setup is the same as the Evora, but the engine bay is larger and the body is made up of panels rather than a clamshell. So it should be an easier job than the Evora. As others have said, plenty of high mileage Evoras still running the original clutch.ou know

Several dealers have now worked out how to do the Evora clutch change without full clam and engine removal. Some are confident enough to do it for a fixed price.

The Emira engine, clutch and transmission setup is the same as the Evora, but the engine bay is larger and the body is made up of panels rather than a clamshell. So it should be an easier job than the Evora. As others have said, plenty of high mileage Evoras still running the original clutch.
Cheers Tom. Which dealers might they be? Not B&C I assume?
 
Hofmanns in Henley and Lotus Silverstone, others I'd have to dig up from the Evora forum. I think some independents are quite confident with doing it too. I haven't needed to ask Back on Track in Guildford, who look after mine, but I'm sure they'd be happy to discuss.
 
Hofmanns in Henley and Lotus Silverstone, others I'd have to dig up from the Evora forum. I think some independents are quite confident with doing it too. I haven't needed to ask Back on Track in Guildford, who look after mine, but I'm sure they'd be happy to discuss.
Thanks Tom
 
That's positive news and sounds promising. It would be good to understand the basic method they use to achieve this!
 
Is Emira manual transmission design the same as Evora or new design? I'm hoping we don't need to remove rear clamshell and engine just to replace clutch.
You guys don't even have the car and you already worry about the clutch? no wonder the Raiders are doing so bad, they are worried about Dallas beating them in the Super Bowl, get and I4 Mr.!! :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 
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You guys don't have even have the car and you already worry about the clutch? no wonder the Raiders are doing so bad, they are worried about Dallas beating them in the Super Bowl, get and I4 Mr.!! :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
Haha, another thread resurrected! You're waving your hands over the Necronomicon with this stuff.

For those just arriving to the thread, two important facts to know:
  1. The Emira doesn't use a clamshell design like the Evora, Exige, etc. It has removable body panels. Also, there's more room in the Emira's engine bay than in prior designs. Hopefully this will make a major service like a clutch replacement significantly easier (and cheaper) to accomplish.

  2. Rapid slip of the clutch plate against the flywheel and pressure plate is what kills clutches prematurely. This can be a result of "riding" the clutch excessively during initial acceleration, or sometimes from riding the clutch between shifts at maximum throttle, but usually it's sudden, violent application of torque during a launch start (resulting in slip under power) that does damage.

    The Emira has a relatively linear torque curve, and while there's a lot of area under that curve, it doesn't make an enormous amount of torque even at peak. A skillfully driven car should therefore have no reason to need a clutch replacement for many, many miles. 100k+ without clutch service shouldn't be unusual.
 
Haha, another thread resurrected! You're waving your hands over the Necronomicon with this stuff.

For those just arriving to the thread, two important facts to know:
  1. The Emira doesn't use a clamshell design like the Evora, Exige, etc. It has removable body panels. Also, there's more room in the Emira's engine bay than in prior designs. Hopefully this will make a major service like a clutch replacement significantly easier (and cheaper) to accomplish.

  2. Rapid slip of the clutch plate against the flywheel and pressure plate is what kills clutches prematurely. This can be a result of "riding" the clutch excessively during initial acceleration, or sometimes from riding the clutch between shifts at maximum throttle, but usually it's sudden, violent application of torque during a launch start (resulting in slip under power) that does damage.

    The Emira has a relatively linear torque curve, and while there's a lot of area under that curve, it doesn't make an enormous amount of torque even at peak. A skillfully driven car should therefore have no reason to need a clutch replacement for many, many miles. 100k+ without clutch service shouldn't be unusual.
I think I'm changing my user name to Necronomicon, sounds like dead Aliens and I'm half dead anyways :)
I'm going to bring Michael back and we're going to Moonwalk on water together, wait until you see that video.... :ROFLMAO:
Seriously, is the front clamshell on the Evora GT separate pieces like the Emira? I've seen several people selling parts of the clam, won't take mine apart until the warranty is out...
 

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